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Cyberactivism Online Activism in Theory and Practice

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Review of "Cyberactivism: Online Activism in Theory and Practice" | Lev Lafayette

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Item specifics Condition: Like New: A book that looks new but has been read. Cover has no visible wear, and the dust jacket if applicable is included for hard covers. May be very minimal identifying marks on the inside cover. Very minimal wear and tear. See all condition definitions - opens in a new window or tab Read more about the condition. About this product. The contributors show how online activists have not only incorporated recent technology as a tool for change, but also how they have changed the meaning of activism, what community means, and how they conceive of collective identity and democratic change.

Topics addressed range from the Zapatista movement's use of the web to promote their cause globally to the establishment of alternative media sources like indymedia. Cyberactivism is essential reading for anyone interested in understanding the impact of the Internet on politics today. Shipping and handling. The seller has not specified a shipping method to Germany. Contact the seller - opens in a new window or tab and request shipping to your location.

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Why hashtag activism isn't enough to change the world

No additional import charges at delivery! This item will be shipped through the Global Shipping Program and includes international tracking. Learn more - opens in a new window or tab. Cyberactivism is a timely collection of essays examining the growing importance of online activism. The contributors show how online activists have not only incorporated recent technology as a tool for change, but also how they have changed the meaning of activism, what community means, and how they conceive of collective identity and democratic change.

Topics addressed range from the Zapatista movement''s use of the web to promote their cause globally to the establishment of alternative media sources like indymedia.

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Cyberactivism is essential reading for anyone interested in understanding the impact of the Internet on politics today. About The Author. Select Parent Grandparent Teacher Kid at heart. Age of the child I gave this to:. Ayers' edited anthology Cyberactivism: Online Activism in Theory and Practice , at least in title, would seem to address this challenge directly, emerging at a moment when the loosely constituted and highly interdisciplinary field of Internet Research is struggling with questions of orientation and identity.

Can a theoretical coupling of technological steering and human action serve to constitute the basis of a new field of inquiry? Given the extremities of studying machines versus people, and the complexities of how social action is achieved through technology, can any one term possibly encompass a diverse set of approaches to Internet Research?

Indeed, do such names and labels really matter? David Silver, in the epilogue to Cyberactivism , clearly suggests that they do. What are its key characteristics?


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Similarly, Laura J. Gurak and John Logie, in their chapter "Internet Protest, from Text to Web," use two case studies to describe effective online protests, characterizing cyberactivism as revolving around positives like speed and reach, and negatives like fact checking and credibility.

Dorothy Kidd describes experiences in the evolution of Indymedia. Ayers compares collective identity in online and offline feminist activist communities, asking what kinds of collective identity are possible in cyberspace; Maria Garrido and Alexander Halavais attempt to tease out and map the structure of the online network of support for the Zapatista movement; Joanne Lebert's case study probes Amnesty International's use of information and communication technologies extensively, characterizing structural efficiencies and inefficiencies; and finally, both Steven McLaine, in "Ethnic Online Communities: Between Profit and Purpose," and Joshua Gamson, in "Gay Media, Inc.

From political economic analyses to "Habermasian" elaborations to social movement theory to cultural and media studies, although Cyberactivism provides a rich snapshot of the landscape of current Internet Research, it falls short of delimiting a new research field.

And the question remains as to why it even attempts to. Activists have not only incorporated the Internet into their repertoire but also, as this volume shows, have changed substantially what counts as activism, what counts as community, collective identity, democratic space, and political strategy.

And online activists challenge us to think about how cyberspace is meant to be used.