e-book The Daughter of the Regiment, Act 1, No. 11: Tis time to part (Vocal Score)

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If you are requesting two assemblies, you can prepare two separate choruses, or use the same children at both. If there are two separate choruses, each group should report 15 minutes before their own performance time to get instructions and to rehearse their music with our accompanist. All study materials are posted below, and several full packets will also be mailed to your school, if you choose to participate in the program, approximately 6 weeks prior to the scheduled performances at each school.

Once upon a time there was a little baby named Marie. Suddenly, the carriage she was traveling in found itself in the middle of a battle. The nanny in charge of Marie was terribly frightened.


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In the confusion of war, she got separated from the baby, and she ran away. Marie was rescued by some of the soldiers. Unable to find anyone to take the baby, they decided to raise her as their own. She slips and is saved by a young man named Tonio. When he is caught sneaking around the camp, Marie explains to the soldiers that Tonio rescued her and that he was not their enemy.

Sulpice has decided that Marie can only marry another member of the 21st Regiment. So Tonio runs away and enlists in the army. Later, Sulpice meets an older woman and her servant, Hortensius. She is the Marquise de Berkenfield. Sulpice remembers meeting a Captain Robert Berkenfield. The Marquise tells Sulpice that her sister had married a Robert Berkenfield and that their child had been lost during a fierce battle.

Marie tells her friends that she must go. When Marie arrives at the home of the Marquise, she is made to learn the manners of the court. No more singing the songs that the soldiers had taught her. The Marquise is hoping the Marie will marry the wealthy Duke of Krackenthorp, and she must learn to behave like a future Duchess. This makes Marie feel sad, but hearing the regiment march by, she cheers up.

The soldiers have brought Tonio to visit Marie. The Marquise comes in and sees them together. She orders Tonio to leave. Tonio convinces the Marquise to tell everyone the truth, that Marie is her daughter not her niece. When the Captain was called back to war the Marquise returned home. More about "The Daughter of the Regiment". Here are the details: West Bay Opera Provides: - three professional singers, in costume, and a pianist; - a minute performance of our English adaptation of The Daughter of the Regiment - acting speaking and supernumerary non-speaking parts, stagehand assignments and an optional chorus designed to involve your student-volunteers in the actual performance - written pedagogical materials for advance in-classroom preparation, including a synopsis of the opera, a biographical note about the composer, mp3s and sheet music for chorus practice if you choose to include the optional chorus , definitions of key opera and music concepts, and materials appropriate for the lower grades, such as coloring sketches of the main characters and opera crossword puzzles.

The Schools Provide: - a piano in good tune - a performance area cleared of other material and available at least one hour prior to the scheduled start of the performance - volunteer student actors, as detailed in the next section - a custodian on standby - in-classroom review of preparation materials to make the experience more meaningful for the students.

Time: Once upon a time The Characters Maria — the "daughter" girl of the regiment soprano Tonio— a Tyrolean peasant tenor Sulpice - a French grenadier sergeant. You can also download individual files, if you don't need the whole packet. Reserve service means a period of service performed by a member of the Reserves that is not continuous full-time service. For the purpose of leave and travel, a restricted destination is a location that the CDF has directed is a restricted destination.

See: Chapter 5 Part 2 Division 1, Leave to travel to a restricted destination. Retirement age has the same meaning as under section 23 4 of the Defence Regulation Return of service obligation means the period of service that a member is required to complete in respect of specified training, education, experience or special duties, which if not completed may result in a service obligation debt under Defence Regulation Serious illness has the following meanings.

See: Chapter 5 Part 9 Division 2. Materially affect the person's future life. Note: A serious illness can include a mental health condition. Service residence means residential accommodation provided by the Commonwealth. It does not include living-in accommodation. See: Chapter 7 Part 6, Service residences. Within Australia — short-term duty means a period of duty that the member's Service has directed to be for six months or less. Trainee means a new entrant to the ADF who is on a trainee salary.

This means a rate of salary under Schedule B. Note: This definition does not apply to existing members of the Permanent Forces who are undergoing a form of in-service training mentioned in Schedule B. These members are entitled to salary non-reduction under Chapter 3 Part 2 Division 2 section 3. They are defined as members undergoing recategorisation training.

Training commitment means an obligation for a member of the Reserves to render service for the purpose of undertaking training. Note: The obligation is created under section 27 of the Defence Regulation Travel card means a charge card that the Department of Defence provides to a member. The member can use the card for any of these purposes, up to the specified monetary limits.

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To pay accommodation, meals and incidental costs directly on behalf of the Commonwealth. To get a cash advance to pay for accommodation if the travel card cannot be used to pay for the accommodation. To get a cash advance to pay for meals and incidentals. When the member pays for their Defence travel with the card, the cost is charged direct to the Commonwealth.

Example: A hotel does not accept the travel card as the method of payment for a member's accommodation. The member could use the card to withdraw cash at an ATM, pay for the accommodation and get a receipt for their stay. See: Defence Travel Management site. Unpaid leave means any of the following leave types. Very serious illness means an illness or injury of such severity that life is imminently endangered. The Commonwealth provides benefits to assist a member's family with costs arising out of Service needs.

Most benefits are provided only for family members who are also dependants living in the same household as the member. The purpose of this Division is to identify the relationships that might give rise to eligibility for Defence benefits. Exception: Not all of the people in a member's family group are included in dependant definitions. Those people excluded are not usually eligible for Defence benefit purposes. The definitions, concepts and categorisations referred to in the following table apply to members and their dependants.

Definition, concept or categorisation. Describe different relationships between a member and other people. Define the living arrangements that may make a person eligible for benefits from Defence. Define which people are a member's dependants for Defence benefit purposes. Describe the category a member is in for Defence benefit purposes. Despite anything the member tells Defence, CDF may examine whether the member or a person in their family meets any of the definitions in this Part and make an assessment as to whether the member or other persons are eligible for benefits on that basis.

In addition to any statement and evidence provided by the member, the CDF may ask for further information if they consider it is necessary to do either of the following. Verify the member's statement of relationship in any form that requires dependant information. Recognise dependants for whom the member is applying for categorisation, or a change in category. The member must provide accurate information and advise of any changes to family circumstances relevant to their eligibility for a category. See: Part 5 section 1. A member's dependant may provide information in relation to a benefit Defence has provided.

Defence may use this information to ensure that correct benefits are provided in relation to the member's service. Recruiting staff and Commanding Officers are to ensure the applicant has access to forms that can be used to notify Defence about their family and dependants, including their primary emergency contact and their next of kin information. The 'normally lives with' requirement set out in section 1. The tests to be a CDF recognised dependant under section 1. Section 1. Child includes the following persons under 21 years of age.

See: Family Law Act A child with a permanent care order issued by a court order that places them in the member's care. Note: A permanent care child is different to a child under a short-term foster care arrangement. A child on a short-term foster placement might live in the member's home with them but is not included as a dependant for the purpose of Defence benefits, unless they become a CDF recognised dependant. Note: To be considered a dependant of the member for Defence benefit purposes, a child must also meet either or both of the following.

The age limit in subsection 1 does not apply for a child who is an invalid or has a disability. Note: Chapter 8 provides some benefits for tertiary students who do not meet this definition because they are too old for this special measure for children. A couple means a member and their spouse or partner. Any of the following persons who normally lives with a member is taken to be the member's dependant for Defence benefit purposes.

The child of a member, defined in section 1. Note 1: The definition in section 1. Note 2: A child who does not normally live with the member may be a dependant recognised by CDF under section 1. Exception: A child who remains in a losing location without other adult dependants of the member is taken not to be a dependant because the child has ceased to be part of the member's household. Example: The member is posted and moves away from the losing location.

The child moves in with their grandparents to continue with employment. The child has ceased to be part of the member's household. A child of a member, spouse or partner who meets both the following circumstances. The child is absent from the member's home only because the child is in full-time education. This can be primary, secondary or undergraduate tertiary education. An adult acting as a guardian or housekeeper, if the member has a dependent child and any of these other conditions are met.

The member's spouse or partner is an invalid or has a disability. The member's spouse or partner is either a member serving at another posting location or a non-Service spouse or partner living away from the family home. A person who is a dependant under section 1. A different definition of dependant is used for members on short-term duty overseas and members on overseas long-term postings. Exception: Members on deployment rely on the same dependant definitions as members in Australia.

The deployment is not considered an overseas posting. In this section a decision maker means one of the following. A dependant with special needs is a person who meets both of the following conditions. The decision maker has recognised the person for Defence benefit purposes under subsection 4. The dependant has been assessed or recognised for the purpose of a condition, in accordance with the following table.

Person who must assess or recognise the condition. The dependant must meet these qualifying criteria. A specialist medical practitioner. Multiple impairments. Speech or language disorders. Example: A speech therapist. Social, emotional or behavioural. Specific learning difficulties. A psychologist. Academically gifted or talented. A psychologist with qualifications and experience in assessing children.

The child must achieve a score at or above the 95 th percentile on either of the following. Any individual or group IQ test. A subscale of an individual IQ test. A member must do all of the following to have a dependant recognised as a dependant with special needs.

Include copies of relevant supporting documents with the application. Send the completed application to the Defence Community Organisation. The decision maker will decide if the member's application for the recognition of a dependant with special needs is approved or not approved. A letter stating the decision will be forwarded to the following people.

Recognition under this section is valid until the circumstances on which the application was granted change. The member must advise the Defence Community Organisation in writing of any change that may affect eligibility. The CDF may recognise a person as a dependant on the basis that the person has an interdependent relationship with a member. The CDF must have regard to the following factors. Whether the person has a close personal relationship to the member. The CDF may consider any of the following circumstances, or any other relevant facts. Whether the relationship is permanent.

This can include any evidence to show that the parties intend the relationship to be permanent. Example: A non-dependent child who is orphaned may be recognised as a dependant under this section while the member applies to adopt the child. Once the adoption is finalised, the child will fall under the ordinary definitions of 'child' and 'dependant' in this Division. The degree of mutual commitment to a shared life.

The reputation and public aspects of the relationship. Example: A statutory declaration that the relationship is one of interdependency. Whether the person is unable to live with the member because of an intellectual, physical or psychiatric disability. Non-example: A member's parent has lived independently, not living with the member as a dependant and then moves into an aged care facility. The parent is not eligible to be recognised as the member's dependant, although the member may have power of attorney for the parent.

Example: A member's aged mother is recognised as a dependant. The member looks after his mother in the member's home. The mother moves permanently to an aged care facility. The mother remains the member's dependant. Whether the member provides the person with substantial financial support.

Non-example: A member's parent who receives the aged pension, is in average health and is renting their own home is not a dependant. Whether one or each of them provides the other with interdependent support and personal care. A member's parent is of pensionable age and suffering from a disabling illness. They are dependant on the member to provide a home and care. A person has medical conditions for which the member provides care.

The person is able to show evidence from their doctor to support this. The CDF may recognise a child as a dependant if the child is expected to live with the member at their posting location for less than 90 nights a year. The CDF must consider all the following criteria. The arrangements for the child's contact or residence with the member. The distance and transport between the child's location and the member's location. The nature and extent of the member's Service commitments.

Other factors that may be relevant to the relationship of the child and the member. The CDF may recognise a member's live-in carer as a dependant for one or more of the benefits listed in the following table. The CDF must be satisfied that both the following circumstances apply. The live-in carer is included on the member's rehabilitation plan.

The recognition of a live-in carer as a dependant under subsection 3 stops when the member no longer needs the carer. The CDF may recognise a person who does not normally live with the member as a dependant for Defence benefit purposes.

Richard Wagner: My Life, Part 1 (1813-1842)

Both the following conditions must be met. The person must be eligible to be recognised as a dependant had they normally lived with the member. It must be reasonable having regard to Service requirements. Example 1: If a couple is not able to live together because of Service reasons, such as a requirement to live-in, the CDF may recognise the couple as dependants of each other for Defence benefit purposes. Example 2: Two members form a couple and ask their career managers for a posting in the same location so that they can live together. Their Service cannot post them together for operational reasons.

The CDF recognises one member as a member with dependants and that member maintains a family home. The other lives in as member with dependants unaccompanied. Non-example: Two members consider themselves a couple but have never sought to be posted together or to form a common household. Their separation is not for Service reasons. There is no evidence that they would normally live together if not for the posting. The CDF does not recognise the couple for benefit purposes and they remain categorised as members without dependants, with no access to housing benefits.

They are, however, listed on the system as a couple for personal emergency contact and notification purposes. The CDF must not recognise a person as a dependant under this section if satisfied that any of the following circumstances apply. The person's relationship with the member is one of mere convenience. A member's year-old child who is unemployed lives with the member for reasons of convenience, not interdependency.

A person who acts as a housekeeper or guardian to a dependent child, when the member and spouse live together and are both working. A member's parent is of pensionable age and looks after the member's children at the member's home but is otherwise able to live independently. There is alternative support, care or accommodation available to the person. Example: A member looks after their grandchild while the child's mother is on holiday overseas. The child's father is working but does not want to pay for child care.

The CDF determines that the child is not a dependant of the member since the child's parents remain responsible for the child's care and support. A member's grandchild has been orphaned. The member has assumed primary care of the child. The child has no other source of care or support. The CDF determines that the grandchild is a dependant of the member. A member's son has become permanently incapacitated after a car accident. The member's son was the primary carer of his child. The member has assumed care of their grandchild because they are the child's closest relative and have applied for legal guardianship.

The CDF determines that the child has no other source of care or support, and is a dependant of the member. The person is a resident child carer living with the member's family but is not otherwise a dependant of the member. The following arrangements apply where a person is not recognised as a dependant under this Division. The member may make their own arrangements for the person. The Commonwealth does not provide any dependant benefits under this Determination in relation to that person, unless a specific provision allows a benefit to be given.

A non-Service spouse or non-Service partner is a member's spouse or partner who is not a member. To assess whether a person normally lives with a member as a dependant either of the following can be considered. Nights the person has lived in a home with the member. Nights the person is reasonably expected to live in a home with the member. For a child, the total of paragraphs 1. Exception: The child is recognised as a dependant under subsection 1. If a person ceases to normally live with a member and the person is no longer expected to live with the member for the purpose of subsection 1, the person ceases to be a dependant of the member under this Determination.

The rule in subsection 3 would not stop the person being recognised as dependant even during the period of the temporary separation. Exception examples: Service partners who can't live together for Service reasons or a person who is unable to live with the member because they require institutional care. Partner means a person who is in either of the following circumstances. A registered relationship prescribed by the law of a State or Territory. Example: A civil partnership. A de facto relationship, in which the member and their partner live together on a genuine domestic basis.

A de facto partner is a member of a couple who live together on a genuine domestic basis, in accordance with section 2F of the Acts Interpretation Act Note 1: A list of circumstances offering guidance as to whether a couple are living together on a genuine domestic basis can be found in sections 2D, 2E and 2F of the Acts Interpretation Act They may include any of the following circumstances, or other relevant facts.

The degree of financial dependence or interdependence, and any arrangements for financial support, between them. The ownership, use and acquisition of their property. Note 2: It is not necessary for a couple to show they meet every circumstance in order to be regarded as living together on a genuine domestic basis. No particular finding in relation to any circumstance is necessary in determining whether two persons have a relationship as a couple.

Note 3: Both the member and the partner are not related by family and both are over the age of consent applicable in the State or Territory in which they live. A member may wish to access Defence benefits on the basis that they have a de facto partner. The member may apply for recognition by completing the relevant Defence form. The member must state in their application the length of time they have lived together with their partner. The member must attach at least one piece of evidence that demonstrates they are living with their partner on a genuine domestic basis.

The 'preferred' piece of evidence is a document showing that the member and their partner live together in a home at the member's posting location. For example, a rental agreement or mortgage papers. This sort of evidence is preferred because it could also satisfy the 'normally lives with' test that must be satisfied for categorisation of the member, later in the process. However, evidence of any other relevant circumstances could be provided. The member may choose to provide additional evidence to support their statement of relationship when submitting forms that require dependant information.

The member's statement on a form that they are in a de facto relationship is relied on to decide the level of benefits provided to the member and their partner. Any false or misleading statement in connection with a benefit may be investigated and may lead to disciplinary action.

To avoid doubt, an application may be approved in relation to a period immediately preceding the application date. Note: Approval of a past period may require adjustment of allowances and benefits and this may result in recovery action, with the member or their partner having to repay benefits to Defence or other Commonwealth agencies. The CDF must accept the member's statement unless it is reasonable to believe there is a need for more information. The CDF may make any of the following decisions about the application.

The CDF may recognise the couple relationship for Defence benefit purposes. The CDF may request further information if they consider it is necessary to do either of the following. Verify the member's statement of relationship on any form that requires information about dependants. Recognise dependants in relation to whom the member is applying for categorisation or to change a category. The CDF may refuse to recognise the couple relationship for Defence benefit purposes.

The CDF must provide reasons to the member. To avoid doubt, where the CDF refuses to recognise the relationship for Defence benefit purposes, the member may not be categorised as a member with dependants on the basis of that relationship. This means they may not receive Defence benefits provided to people defined as dependants under section 1.

Note 1: Even without a de facto partner, a member may still be categorised as a member with dependants on the basis that other dependants live with them, for example, the member's dependant parent, recognised under section 1. In refusing to recognise a couple relationship for Defence benefit purposes, the CDF must not take into account any factors that are irrelevant to that decision.

Example: The member's rank or employment category, personal choices, religion. Approval or refusal of an application based on whether or not the member meets the definition in this section is taken to be both of the following. A decision point which may be the subject of a complaint for redress. To avoid doubt, the CDF may decide that a member falls in or out of the definition of a couple relationship even if the member has not provided a statement in an application to show that they meet the definition of a de facto partner.

Example 1: A newly recruited member completes their initial paperwork incorrectly, so they are categorised as a member without dependants. Although not living with their partner during the initial training period, prior to joining the Service the member had been living with their partner on a genuine domestic basis for a number of years, having children together and shared bank accounts.

The new recruit may not be able to provide recent evidence of the necessary factors to have dependency recognised. However, in keeping with administrative law principles and having regard to all the relevant factors, the CDF can use their discretion to recognise the couple as de facto partners for Defence benefit purposes. Example 2: A member is unconscious. The member has made no application for recognition of a dependant. However, the member's partner approaches Defence for assistance. The partner is able to show that they have lived with the member for some years and family and friends recognise the member and their partner as a de facto couple.

The CDF may recognise a de facto relationship if the partners are temporarily separated due to one of the following reasons. The member or their partner has an illness or infirmity which prevents them from living together. Example: The partner is caring for their parent in the parent's home for a few weeks while the parent recovers from surgery. To avoid doubt, if a de facto relationship is recognised on a State or Territory register, then the member does not need to reapply for recognition if the couple move and continue to normally live together as a couple in a State or Territory other than the one in which they were registered.

A member's primary emergency contact is an adult, usually in the member's family, who is nominated as the first contact if the member is assigned a casualty status that needs to be notified to the family. Note: This DI G contains a definition of 'next of kin' for the purpose of recording relatives on the Defence personnel system. It works differently to the family definitions in this Determination, such as 'nominated family' for leave travel and for funeral benefits, where the next of kin is a dependant or other person the member has nominated.

Spouse, for a member, means a person who is married to the member in accordance with the Marriage Act Note: To be considered a dependant of the member for Defence benefit purposes, a spouse must also meet the tests in sections 1. They might need to provide evidence that they live in a home together for the 'normally lives with' test.

A member's category is a precondition of their eligibility for Defence-provided benefits. The member must be assessed as meeting the conditions for one of the following categories. A member with dependants unaccompanied under section 1. Note: This assessment is a decision point even though it may also be used to verify the facts. It helps make sure that the member and any dependants get the special benefits that are available to assist them. The member may state in an application for categorisation or for benefits that they meet the conditions for one of the categories described in subsection 1.

The member must provide evidence to support an application for categorisation or a change of category. Note: A member must advise about changes to family circumstances relevant to their eligibility for a category under this Division in accordance with section 1. This advice must be in writing. See: Part 5. If no application has been made by the member or if the CDF is satisfied that there has been a change in the member's circumstances, CDF may take any of the following decisions.

The CDF must notify the member of the decision. A decision about whether the conditions for recognition of a dependant are satisfied. Any relevant decision about eligibility for benefits for the member or dependant. Sections Section 56 of the Defence Force Discipline Act creates a military disciplinary offence for a false statement made in an application for a benefit. Example: The member moves in with a new partner and forms a de facto relationship, but does not apply for recognition.

The CDF recognises that the member's previous relationship has ceased and a new de facto relationship has begun. The member's eligibility for housing benefits is reassessed based on the member's new living arrangements. Until 30 June a member may choose to make an application to have a de facto partner recognised as a dependant for the purposes of section 1.

Note: This means that for the period commencing on 30 March and ending 30 June a member can choose to have a de facto relationship recognised through either the Defence Instruction General Personnel , Recognition of interdependent partnerships or in accordance with section 1. The CDF may determine the form that is to be used by a person to apply for categorisation or recognition of a relationship for the purpose of eligibility for Defence-provided benefits. A member without dependants is a member who does not meet conditions for either of the following categories. The member has no ADF-recognised dependants.

The member does not intend to ever live in the same house as their family and so the family is not recognised as dependants for Defence benefit purposes. A member with dependants means a member who normally lives with at least one dependant. This is usually in a home at the posting location. To avoid doubt, a member of a dual-serving couple remains a member with dependants if their partner is categorised member with dependants unaccompanied and so is only temporarily not living with the member.

Example: A member couple live together in Darwin. One of the members is posted to Melbourne. That member becomes a member with dependants unaccompanied. The member in Darwin lives alone until the other member returns from the post, but is still eligible to be a member with dependants. A member who has a dependant recognised under subsection 1. Example: A Service couple are unable to form a common household as a de facto couple because they have not been granted the posting to adjacent locations that they requested.

They are recognised as dependants for the period of the posting. However, the couple separate after eight months. From that point on, the interdependency relationship ceases and the two members are no longer recognised as members with dependants. A member with dependants unaccompanied is a subset of the category member with dependants. A member must not apply for member with dependants or member with dependants unaccompanied categorisation for a spouse or partner if they already receive Defence benefits or entitlements for another spouse or partner.

Example: A member is married but separated from their spouse. The member's spouse ceases to be a recognised dependant for Defence benefit purposes when the member no longer normally lives with them.

The member currently lives with another person. The member must take steps to amend their details to cease benefits for their former spouse and have their new partner recognised for benefit purposes. A member with dependants unaccompanied is a member who meets the conditions set out for that category in Chapter 8 Part 3 Division 1, Becoming a member with dependants unaccompanied. See: Chapter 8 Part 3 Division 1, Becoming a member with dependants unaccompanied. The purpose of the member with dependants unaccompanied category is described in section 8. See: Chapter 8 Part 3 Division 1 section 8.

The package provided to a member with dependants unaccompanied and their dependants may recognise the additional costs of maintaining dependants in two locations. It may include benefits such as the following. Fully-subsidised accommodation for the member at the member's duty location. Reunion travel, food, utilities, and separation allowances.

Partly-subsidised accommodation for the dependants. In Chapters 1 to 17, a reference to a rank is a reference to an Army rank. It includes a reference to the equivalent rank in the Navy and Air Force. This is unless it is made clear otherwise. Note: This is consistent with long-standing Defence practice whereby Army ranks are used, often followed by the letter E for Equivalent rank. To simplify and save space, the text does not include the E symbol. Where there is a reference to the three Services, the normal order is followed — Navy, Army, Air Force.

Equivalent rank means the corresponding rank set out under Schedule 1 of the Defence Act A Chaplain's classification is used to work out their conditions of service benefits, as listed in the following table. A member must meet certain obligations when they have an entitlement or benefit. This Part sets out those obligations. A member must provide accurate information in their application. Defence may take into account information that a member's dependant provides, to ensure that correct benefits are provided in relation to the member's service.

Related Information: Part 3 Division 2 section 1. If a member has claimed a benefit, the CDF may from time to time ask the member to provide information about their relationships and living arrangements. This information is used to verify the relationships or living arrangements that affect eligibility. It may also be used to decide which category a member is in and what benefits they and any dependants are eligible for. Examples: Marriage or registration certificate, birth certificates, life insurance policy that names dependants, household bills, statutory declarations.

Giving false or misleading information is a serious offence. This section applies if a member or their dependants meet both these conditions. The circumstances on which they qualified for the benefit change. Examples: A child leaves home, a new baby is born, a couple relationship ends. A person who applies for a benefit under this Determination is responsible for informing themselves about the entitlement they are claiming.

Exception: The CDF may accept a notice provided by the member on a later date if satisfied that the delay is reasonable.

La fille du régiment (Donizetti, Gaetano)

Note: This requirement helps the Commonwealth prevent overpayments being made. If a member does not advise about changes, they may receive payments they are not entitled to, which would need to be repaid. The member must also provide a written notice of the change to the administrator of their type of housing assistance, within 14 days after it happens, as relevant. A member must fill in and provide the relevant form to their Commanding Officer as soon as practicable after any of these events.

The number of dependants the member has changes. Example: The member's de facto relationship is recognised under section 1. The member is notified of a change of posting location and it is reasonable to expect that the new posting location may result in the member's eligibility for one of the following categories also changing. See: Part 3 Division 2 section 1. Member with dependants unaccompanied. Part 3 Division 2 section 1.

Chapter 8 Part 3 Division 1, Becoming a member with dependants unaccompanied. Member without dependants. This section applies if a person has been paid more than the amount they are eligible for. The person must repay to the Commonwealth the difference between their benefit entitlement and the amount they were paid. Example: A member is paid vehicle allowance in advance of travel. They do not travel, or they travel less than they expected to. They must repay all or part of the allowance, whichever applies. Exception: Where tax has been deducted from an amount overpaid and the amount was paid in a previous financial year.

This section applies to a member not receiving salary for either of the following reasons. The member meets a condition under section A. The member is on a nonworking period under the member's flexible service determination. Any unpaid contributions or payments are a debt to the Commonwealth. The Commonwealth may recover any unpaid contributions or payments. This section applies if a member must repay an overpayment of salary or allowances to the Commonwealth.

The Commonwealth may recover the overpaid amount from the salary and allowances that the member has been — or may be — paid. The Commonwealth still has the right to recover the overpaid amount by other means. This section applies if a member would get a personal benefit from a decision they are authorised to make. The member must refer the decision to another decision-maker at or above their rank or classification. This section applies to a member who is eligible for the reimbursement of a payment they made.

The member must provide either of the following as evidence that they made the payment. Written evidence, including any original receipts. A statutory declaration if written evidence is not available. The member must provide the items when they lodge their claim for reimbursement or as soon as practical after that time. Note: A person who knowingly makes a false statement in a statutory declaration under the Statutory Declarations Act , as amended, is guilty of an offence under section 11 of that Act.

They could go to prison for four years. This section applies if both these conditions are met. Both members have any of the benefits in this table for the same period. Assistance or reimbursement for home purchase or sale. Reimbursement for loss on sale of furniture and effects. Reimbursement for cost of insurance on removal of urgently needed household items.

Reimbursement for education costs for a child. A member may have a benefit listed in subsection 1 while their adult dependant has a similar benefit that is not under Chapters 1 to In this case, the listed benefit is reduced by the amount of the similar benefit. Indemnity for loss or damage arising from removal within Australia.

See: Chapter 6 Part 4, Compensation for loss or damage to items stored or removed. See: Chapter 4 Part 8 Division 1. Special rules apply to dual entitlement for the following housing benefits — see Chapter 7.

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Settling in and settling out overseas — meal costs. Hardship allowance — member posted before 1 July See: Chapter 12 Part 3 Section The member is on a flexible service determination — during their nonworking period. The member may nominate, in writing, an adult dependant to pay contributions owed by the member if all of the following conditions are met. The dependant is also a member. The dependant may revoke consent at any time. Contributions are to be paid through the Department of Defence pay system. If the contribution is not paid by the dependant, the contribution may be recovered from the member as a debt owed to the Commonwealth.

A member may seek to have their benefit paid to their adult dependant or another person. These conditions apply. The member must nominate in writing the person to receive the payment on their behalf. The other person must consent to the disclosure of their personal or financial information, and to receiving the payment. The member must provide the alternative payment details.

Example: A member who is deployed has to pay rent at home. They may choose to have their rent allowance paid to their adult dependant, who will arrange the rent payments on their behalf. Alternatively, the benefit will be paid as specifically provided for under another Chapter.

This section applies if an amount is payable to a person who has a legal disability. Examples: A child under 18 years old.

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A member who is seriously injured and unable to act on their own behalf. The amount may be paid to a trustee appointed by the CDF to act on behalf of the person. The CDF must consider any instructions the member gave before the legal disability began. Both these conditions apply to an amount paid to a trustee under subsection 2. The trustee will hold it on trust for the benefit of the person in accordance with any directions of the CDF.

An amount payable to a member on their death may be paid to either of these parties. The amount may be payable to more than one dependant. In this case, the CDF must consider the losses each dependant suffers through the loss of the member's earnings. If no-one is eligible for a payable amount, no payment will be authorised. For the purpose of payment of salary or allowances, a member is taken to have ceased continuous full-time service when the member is in either of the following situations.

Exception: If the member is later found alive, the period for which the member was missing is taken not to break their service. Example: A member was deployed on overseas service on 31 August The member was reported missing, presumed dead, on 30 June but was later found alive on 30 April For the 10 months when the member was missing, presumed dead 30 June — 30 April , they would not normally be entitled to payment of salary as their continuous full-time service was taken to have ceased.

But because the member was later found, they were considered to be on continuous full-time service for that period and therefore entitled to salary. If a certificate of death has not been provided to state a date of death or presumed death for a member under a relevant Commonwealth, State or Territory law, then for the purpose of the benefits provided under this Determination, the CDF, a Service Chief or the Director-General Defence Community Organisation may determine that a member died on a particular date.

See: Chapter 11 Part 3, Payment of financial benefits on death. This Chapter contains legislation and guidelines for members who join or leave the ADF. This Chapter includes the following Parts. Leaving the ADF: Redundancy and gratuities. This Part contains benefits and guidelines for members joining the ADF. This Part includes the following Divisions. A person who has applied to join the ADF may be eligible for assistance with travel costs, allowances and accommodation costs. They may have travel, accommodation and meal benefits, if they meet all these conditions.

They are required to have an examination or interview to see if they are suitable to join the ADF. They go to a recruiting centre to be examined or interviewed. They live at a location not served by the transport system of the city or town where the recruiting centre is located. The applicant is eligible for an allowance if they pay for their travel between their normal place of residence and the recruiting centre.

The amount of the allowance depends on their means of travel, as set out in this table. See: Chapter 9 Part 6 Division 2 for the relevant benefits. What the Commonwealth would pay for fares if they were a member at the rank for which they are applying for appointment or enlistment. The applicant is eligible for an allowance for accommodation and meals if they meet both these conditions.

They travel between their normal place of residence and the recruiting centre for a period that extends overnight. Their meals and accommodation are not provided at Commonwealth expense. What the Commonwealth would have paid if it provided accommodation and meals. What the applicant paid for accommodation and meals. What the applicant would be eligible for if they were a member at the rank for which they are applying for appointment or enlistment.

See: Chapter 9 Part 5, Payment of travel costs for the relevant benefits. Note: If the applicant's travel period does not extend overnight, the meal allowance rates under section 4. See: Chapter 4 Part 5, Meal allowances. A country applicant who travels to or from a recruiting centre is eligible to either a prepaid fare or an allowance under section 2. The applicant must repay to the Commonwealth any prepaid amount they do not spend. This includes if the journey is cancelled.

Persons eligible for travel under this Division are not eligible for any Commonwealth assistance for excess baggage. They may be compensated for loss of wages or salary if they meet all these conditions. They attend a recruiting centre to be examined or interviewed. They lose salary or wages because of that attendance. The applicant is eligible for the lesser of these two amounts. The wages or salary they would have earned during the period they are reasonably required to be absent from the employment because of the attendance. This does not include any payment for overtime. The salary that would be payable for that period to a normal entry recruit during basic training.

The applicant is not eligible if they have not disclosed in their application a significant fact that makes them ineligible to join the ADF. The Scheme assists members with career transition when they separate from the ADF after continuous full-time service. Effective career transition is a shared responsibility. It is mainly up to the member to start preparing well before their intended date of separation.

The Career Transition Assistance Scheme is available to all members of the Permanent Forces and members of the Reserves who have been on continuous full-time service. See: Division 2, Eligibility and levels of assistance. This table outlines the definition used in this Part. Service in Australia, overseas or on attachment or exchange with the armed forces of another country, by a member of the Permanent Forces or a member of the Reserves on continuous full-time service.

About the Career Transition Assistance Scheme. Approved absence for career transition activities. The ADF has an obligation to assist members with career transition when they leave the ADF after qualifying service, whether voluntarily or involuntarily. The Career Transition Assistance Scheme provides phased benefits, tools and services in support of this obligation. These are the objectives of the Career Transition Assistance Scheme. To support the career transition of members from Service to suitable civilian employment, with the minimum involuntary break in continuity of employment.

To enhance the ability of members to competitively market themselves for suitable civilian employment. The Career Transition Assistance Scheme should be accessed during the last 12 months of service, or up to 12 months after termination. This aims to ensure knowledge and skills acquired through the scheme are current at the time of career transition. Assistance is divided into seven components. These are described in the Divisions listed in this table.

Medical or dental officers seeking refresher training should refer to Chapter 4 Part 8 Division 3, Former medical or dental officer — refresher training. Defence Assisted Study Scheme applicants are required to substantiate their intention to leave the ADF within a realistic timeframe. To be eligible for the scheme, the member must provide proof of their intention to separate from the ADF within 12 months. Proof must be one of the following. Level of assistance is determined by both these factors. The total period of qualifying service at the date of termination. Qualifying service for the Career Transition Assistance Scheme may be an aggregate of periods of service.

This may be in one or more Services of the ADF. There may be a break between periods of service. Note: Reserve service or service as a member of the armed forces of another country does not count toward qualifying service for the Career Transition Assistance Scheme. This table outlines eligibility for levels of assistance. The member's service has been terminated because the member is medically unfit. The member's service has been terminated because the member cannot usefully serve because of redundancy. The member has received a special benefit payment under Part 3 Division 3.

The member ceases service on or after reaching their retirement age. A member whose assistance level is 2 or 3 may be provided assistance for either of the following benefits. Exception: The member may be provided with assistance for both benefits if either of the following applies.

Exception: For members whose service is terminated for medical reasons, the Executive Officer, Career Transition Assistance may authorise an extension. A member is not eligible for assistance under the scheme in these situations. If the termination was because of a medical condition that in the opinion of the CDF arose from any of these causes.

Due to serious or wilful misconduct, alcohol or drugs. Unreasonable exposure to an abnormal risk of injury. A pre-existing medical condition that was known but not disclosed, on enlistment. Members must apply for and complete any career transition assistance activity within the month preservation period. The cost of Career Transition Assistance Scheme provisions will be paid once approval has been granted. Note: There is no eligibility for travel, accommodation and associated costs after termination.

In certain cases, a member may access some Career Transition Assistance Scheme provisions and later receive approval to withdraw their application for termination. In these cases, the member is eligible to access unused provisions when reapplying for termination. Further qualifying service may make a member eligible for a higher level of assistance. There is no payment for unused Career Transition Assistance Scheme benefits. ADF members who transfer to an active element of the Reserves, and whose major form of post-separation employment is from Reserve service, are not considered to have transitioned into the civilian workforce.

For these members, Career Transition Assistance Scheme provisions are preserved while Reserve service remains the major form of employment. On ceasing Reserve service, benefits are automatically preserved for 12 months from the last day of service. Note: The preserved benefit does not include the approved absence component. Members undertaking activities approved under the Career Transition Assistance Scheme before termination, may be covered for compensation under the Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Scheme.

See: Chapter 11, ADF-related compensation. Such remuneration may jeopardise any claim for compensation relating to those activities. Members who access career transition assistance after termination may be covered for compensation by the Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Scheme, if the arrangements are approved under the Career Transition Assistance Scheme. Travel costs to attend approved Career Transition Assistance Scheme activities will not be paid for members at Levels 1 and 2. There is limited scope for travel for Level 3 members.

The member must justify why they cannot undertake the career transition training in their current or termination location. Normally, Career Transition Assistance Scheme activities are to be undertaken within one location. In cases where members justify travel, travel at Commonwealth expense will be approved for only one trip to and from one nominated location. In cases where members cannot undertake approved Career Transition Assistance Scheme activities in their current or termination location, they must submit an itinerary and undertake the activities in a location where Service accommodation is available.

If Service accommodation is not available, the member must justify why a location without Service accommodation must be used.