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Azumi Fujita. On March 18, , it was announced that Paramount Television and Anonymous Content were producing a television series to be directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga. Ashley Zalta was also announced as a co-executive producer. At the time, the series was being shopped to various networks and was searching for a writer. Alongside the initial series announcement, it was reported that Emma Stone and Jonah Hill were finalizing deals to star in the series. Principal photography for the series began on August 15, in New York City and was expected to conclude by the end of November On April 18, , Netflix released the first official images from the series.

On September 13, , the series held its world premiere at the Southbank Centre in London, England. The series has been met with a positive response from critics upon its premiere. The website's critical consensus reads, " Maniac enthralls with its dazzling visuals, adventurous narrative, and striking performances from both Emma Stone and Jonah Hill.

In a positive review, Variety ' s Daniel D'Addario commended the series saying, "The beautifully made Maniac plunges viewers into a fictional world that's both divergent from our own and instantly recognizable—and then reinvents itself several times over, skittering across time, space and genre to tell a story of connection that feels urgent and deeply, painfully human As a trial of something new, Maniac passes every test, and ascends instantly to take its place among the very best TV of the year.

In a more negative critique, Darren Franich of Entertainment Weekly awarded the series a grade of "C-" and criticized it saying, "For all its manic poses and deflationary snark, it's ultimately patronizingly sentimental. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Cary Joji Fukunaga Patrick Somerville. Billy Magnussen as Jed Milgrim, one of Owen's brothers who is put on trial for sexual misconduct. Magnussen also portrays Grimsson, a man whom Owen hallucinates that looks nearly identical to Jed. Julia Garner as Ellie Landsberg, Annie's deceased younger sister whose death she feels responsible for.

Robert Muramoto, a colleague of Dr. The Loeschs also portray the Ladies of Arquesta. Geoffrey Cantor as Frank, the Milgrim family's lawyer that is representing Jed. Kavoussi also portrays Bianca Forsythe and provides the voice of Dragonfly. Leo Fitzpatrick as Lance, a smuggler of exotic wildlife for use in clothing and one of Sebastian's two sons.

Maxine Prescott as Mrs. Finklestein, an elderly woman that lives in Owen's apartment building. Prescott also portrays Harriet, a resident of the old folks home that Linda works at. Joseph Sikora as JC, a smuggler of exotic wildlife for use in clothing and one of Sebastian's two sons. David Fierro as Bobby, Olliver Hightower's driver. Fiero also portrays an AdBuddy employee that Owen hires. Wein also portrays an AdBuddy employee with halitosis that Owen hires. Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved March 25, Retrieved July 29, The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved August 13, Entertainment Tonight.

Retrieved July 30, Retrieved April 18, Retrieved August 6, Irish Independent. Retrieved September 21, September 21, Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved January 6, CBS Interactive.


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Retrieved December 23, Retrieved September 15, The Washington Post. Retrieved March 30, Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved January 20, Retrieved January 28, Retrieved February 3, Retrieved January 19, Retrieved December 6, November 29, Awards Circuit. Retrieved December 3, Clair, Matt January 4, Retrieved January 5, Cary Joji Fukunaga. It True Detective Maniac Netflix original ended series. Categories : s American comedy-drama television series American television series debuts American television series endings American television series based on Norwegian television series English-language television programs Mental illness in television Borderline personality disorder in fiction Netflix original programming Surrealist television series American surreal comedy television series Television series by Paramount Television Television series by Anonymous Content.

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Patrick Somerville. Owen Milgrim is a man suffering from schizophrenia , but hiding his symptoms from his family, including seeing an imaginary brother named Grimsson who looks like his brother Jed with a moustache who keeps reminding him that he is on a mission of some kind. His family runs a successful industrial business and are protecting Jed from accusations of sexual misconduct, something Owen plans on defending him from by providing a false alibi. Eventually, Owen is laid off from his job and refuses his father's offer of working with his company and accepting his money.

He hears about Neberdine, a pharmaceutical company, and signs on to test their new drug which can supposedly cure all disorders. While there, he meets the anti-social Annie Landsberg, who Grimsson explains is the agent he needs to see. When he speaks to her, Annie keeps him from getting them both in trouble by "confirming" her association to him, but tells him not to "blow [their] cover".

Owen complies as he prepares for the tests. In a flashback, Annie smokes in her apartment by herself, crushing up one of NPB's "A" pills while cursing "This is it, this is the last one. The One I Love Year: Director: Charlie McDowell The dark insecurities that reside inside even the happiest of marriages—issues of trust and fading passion—are given playful yet thoughtful treatment in The One I Love , a comedy-drama in which a couple learns more about each other than maybe they should.

Ethan Duplass and Sophie Moss are a Los Angeles married couple whose relationship is in serious trouble. At first, this retreat proves successful, as Ethan and Sophie feel more relaxed and connected than they have in years. Though principally a comedy-drama, The One I Love does dip its toe into other genres, including science fiction or, depending on how you view the unfolding events, horror , and Charlie McDowell in his feature debut proves himself up to the challenge of juggling potentially contradictory tones.

Coco Year: Director: Lee Unkrich With the release of Coco , the 19th film from Pixar Studios, there are at least two questions the answer to which every member in the audience can be certain of before that desk lamp comes hopping across the screen. Will the voice acting be superb, enhancing the aforementioned animation in every way? You bet it will! Inside Out and Finding Dory were home runs, but in between, there was The Good Dinosaur a weak infield popup, at best. Fans of the series passionately criticized the film for relieving Lupin of his anarchic predilections and instead casting him in the mold of a true gentleman thief, stealing only when his nebulous sense of honor permits it.

A flawed Miyazaki film is a triumph all the same. Three Year: Director: Johnnie To Can you imagine a worse place for cops and robbers to play a game of cat and mouse than a bustling, overstuffed hospital? Three is both a sort-of chamber piece and a lesson in escalating tension. In it, To, per usual, packages stellar filmmaking with a deceptively simple premise. This time around, Dr. Tong Wei Zhao , a neurosurgeon whose ambition is her greatest vice, is on duty when Inspector Chen Louis Koo and his team bring in a wounded suspect Wallace Chung for treatment.

Just before he goes under the knife, the suspect refuses medical care and begins an elaborate minute battle of wits with his arrester and his provider. In his towering body of work, Three is a satisfyingly minor entry, but minor To is better than major films by most any other contemporary filmmaker you can imagine.

Then stabs a shard of cow femur through it. Come for the violence, The Night Comes for Us bids you—and, also, stay for the violence. Finally, leave because of the violence. Other scenes are expansive in their controlled chaos and cartoonish blood-letting, like Streets of Rage levels, come to all-too-vivid life: the butcher shop level, the car garage level and a really cool later level where you play as a dope alternate character and take on a deadly sub-boss duo who have specialized weapons and styles and—no, seriously, this movie is a videogame.

Take it as a testament to the raw power of the visceral: A certain breed of cinematic action—as if by laws of physics—demands a reaction. An unhappy little girl discovers an alternate reality that seems to offer all the magic and wonder her real home lacks, only to discover the sinister implications behind the candy-colored exteriors. Perhaps the greatest stop-motion film ever, it even looks great in 3D.

A buddy comedy built atop the premise of a man Paul Dano lugging around, and bonding with, a flatulent talking corpse Daniel Radcliffe —but cinema is a medium in which miracles are possible, and one such miracle occurs in Swiss Army Man. A film with such a seemingly unpalatable concept becomes, against all odds, a near-profound existential meditation. Witness with amazement what bizarrely heartfelt splendors its creators will come up with next. Quite the contrary, her movie is refreshingly candid and self-critical: She may be the star of the show, but she has a story to tell and the right perspective to frame it properly.

Tan narrates the documentary as a memory piece, recounting her childhood in Singapore with her best friend Jasmine, where they were the two cool kids in their pretty square school, dreaming of being filmmakers and leaving their mark.

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In her late teens and perhaps smitten with this man who showed her such attention—the documentary is cagey on the subject—Tan was intoxicated by the rush of making a film that she wrote and would be the star of. The documentary traces the strange, mysterious journey of the project, which was waylaid by Georges sneaking off with the reels of film with a vague promise of finishing the work.

That never happened, and 20 years later Tan decides to open those old wounds, connecting with her old friends and trying to determine what became of Georges. But the documentary ends up being less about tracking down the film canisters than being an exploration of nostalgia, friendship and the allure of mentors. Tan is lively, self-effacing company throughout—her voice has just the right sardonic tinge—but her visits with Jasmine and Sophia are particularly lovely and illuminating, suggesting how lifelong pals can see us in ways that we cannot.

His direction is elegant and restrained, because he has the confidence not to force his effects. Undoubtedly, part of his confidence comes from the gift he got from Braga, who gives the performance of her career, doing the same thing with her voice, face and body that Filho does with his camera, finding economical gestures that express infinite emotions and ideas. The mystery here is not about whether or not William was murdered; the mystery is what lies at the heart of community bonds and national identity, and how allegiances change as communities grow larger.

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Ex Machina Year: Director: Alex Garland While popular science-fiction films have taught us that, no matter what we do, robots that become self-aware will eventually rise up and kill us, recent advances in artificial intelligence in the real world have confirmed something much seedier about the human imperative: If given the technology to design thinking, feeling robots, we will always try to have sex with them. Taking cues from obvious predecessors like A Space Odyssey and AI —some will even compare it to Her — Ex Machina stands solidly on its own as a highly stylized and mesmerizing film, never overly dependent on CGI, and instead built upon the ample talents of a small cast.

Garland interprets the phrase literally: Here, that machine is a robot named Ava, played by Swedish actress Alicia Vikander, and that nowhere is where her creator, Nathan Oscar Isaac , performs his research and experiments. Ava is a heavenly mechanical body of sinewy circuitry topped with a lovely face, reminiscent of a Chris Cunningham creation. Her creator is an alcoholic genius and head of a Google-like search engine called Bluebook which has made him impossibly rich. Nathan also intends to use Caleb to conduct something of a Turing test on steroids with Ava to determine if she can truly exhibit human behavior.

Is he making an act of supplication in his final moments? Is he submitting to death itself? Or is his gesture meant to be interpreted as an acknowledgment of his helplessness, a pantomime outcry at his betrayal and abandonment? No matter how many times this scene plays out, its subtexts remain open to interpretation. Here, bad things happen to good people—and really only to good people. Wain takes innocence and obliterates it, punishes it, gleefully destroying all nice memories anyone would ever hold dear about long lost summers, first loves and youth.

Without a shred of wistfulness, Wet Hot American Summer surpasses its origins in parody and becomes something more: It earns its comedy. Taunting our very explicitly American tendency to let everything we touch devolve into sentimentality, the film proves that when we obsess over remembering ourselves at our best, we might as well be celebrating us at our worst.

With American Honey , she turns her attention to the United States, and what she finds is a vibrant, troubled, mesmerizing land. Impulsively, she abandons her makeshift family—her boyfriend seems like a redneck cretin, anyway—and runs off to join another. The United States has often promoted itself as a place for second chances.

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All Star wants is any chance at all. Because of the ambition of the project and the amount of years it covers, Boyhood might initially seem underwhelming. In a sense, the world of Boyhood is the world the rest of us have had to negotiate right along with him. By the time Boyhood ends, no grand resolutions have occurred. Mason will keep living his life, and so will we. But by observing the everyday with such grace, Linklater allows us the opportunity to do the same. There are few better gifts a filmmaker can give his audience.


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Nocturama Year: Director: Bertrand Bonello Nocturama trusts its audience—more, even, than its audience may want to be trusted. Throughout, director Betrand Bonello folds timelines, indulges in flashbacks and replays moments from different perspectives, rarely with any warning but hardly without precision or consistency, investigating the comparatively small world of his film from every angle while implying that a much bigger, much more complicated world exists outside of its admittedly limited view. Instead, Nocturama is all surface, all watching : the faces of these innocents as they silently go about their terror, the tension that arises from knowing there is so much obscured behind those faces but also seeing so much so clearly in those faces, and then knowing that we will never know.

Because these teens seem fine, even existentially so. They seem middle class, comfortable, unburdened by the wiles of puberty, free to do what they want, be with whom they want, say what they want—and only in the department store, amongst designer clothes and expensive, pointless home goods, do they yearn for more, potentially blowing up Paris not to protest anything, but to beg to be a part of the elite who define it.

This is terrorism not against capitalism, but for it. Bonello trusts his audience to know the difference. Evans knows exactly how long to needle the audience with a slow-burning mystery before letting the blood dams burst; his conclusion both embraces supernatural craziness and uncomfortably realistic human violence. Gone is the precision of combat of The Raid , replaced by a clumsier brand of wanton savagery that is empowered not by honor but by desperate faith.

Evans correctly concludes that this form of violence is far more frightening. One could trace his films, from his debut Kicking and Screaming to the one before Frances Ha Greenberg and see a slow but increasingly steady focus on the individual, as well as his abandonment of an ironic, sometimes caustic stance against the very characters he writes. He has settled down and created a film imbued with love, fun and melancholy. Cop Car Year: Director: Jon Watts A lean, rugged neo-noir that tweaks genre conventions by putting two young boys at the center of its attention, Cop Car opens with credits shimmering like police lights.

They decide that the car has been abandoned. Apparently having both run away from home, the two speed around the cow-populated landscape like juvenile delinquents unconcerned about the potentially serious consequences of their actions. Such uninhibited, devil-may-care recklessness gives the material an immediate jolt of peril, even before Watts rewinds his tale to reveal the origins of the car and its owner. A blockbuster action flick, a thriller, a pulp plot, a winking noir, a commentary on classism in an increasingly urbanized society—the movie is all of these things, down to the marrow of its very existence.

Plus, he does so with total respect, showing that he understands their films inside and out. And in that intimate knowledge he knows even better that filmmaking is a conflagration: Best to burn it all down and see what remains than build it from the ground up. Decay, loss of memory, insecurity, arrogance: Assayas boils these monolithic themes down to a near-pyrrhic partnership between an aging French actress Juliette Binoche and her American assistant Kristen Stewart , following their commingling of generations and cultural heritages as they traipse through one fiction after another.

Instead, the core of Clouds of Sils Maria is a single feeling, encompassed within a single image. In the titular clouds, which are only observable at certain times, under certain conditions, there is the intuition that there is so much else in this world to see. And the film aches with this sentiment, that no matter what we accomplish, we will always miss out on something equally worth accomplishing: some other part to play, some other life to live. Such, Assayas claims, is the bitter sweetness of life. Paced to near perfection, A Dark Song is ostensibly a horror film but operates as a dread-laden procedural, mounting tension while translating the process of bereavement as patient, excruciating manual labor.

In the end, something definitely happens, but its implications are so steeped in the blurry lines between Christianity and the occult that I still wonder what kind of alternate realms of existence Gavin is getting at. But A Dark Song thrives in that uncertainty, feeding off of monotony. Sophia may hear phantasmagorical noise coming from beneath the floorboards, but then substantial spans of time pass without anything else happening, and we begin to question, as she does, whether it was something she did wrong maybe, when tasked with not moving from inside a small chalk circle for days at a time, she screwed up that portion of the ritual by allowing her urine to dribble outside of the boundary or whether her grief has blinded her to an expensive con.

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Casting JonBenet Director: Kitty Green An unlikely cross-section of humanity also populates Casting JonBenet , which boasts a provocative idea that yields enormous emotional rewards. We can sense exactly how pissed off she is behind the lens. We can only be applaud its daring. If Dostoevsky was re-framing the Christ narrative, Happy as Lazzaro re-frames the very idea of a Christ narrative until it is something else entirely. Here, Christ is a mythic wolf and our kind idiot Lazzaro Adriano Tardiolo is a touched Lazarus; the difference between them is a matter of substance, time and place.

Lazzaro tries to follow, perhaps foolishly, perhaps blindly…but happily, nonetheless. They know that eventually the matters of her husband and children, plus their extended family, must be reconciled. Avengers: Infinity War Year: Directors: Anthony Russo, Joe Russo Avengers: Infinity War is epic in a way that has been often aspired to but never fully grasped when it comes to the translation from comic book panel to the Big Screen.

As a result, writers Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely have ample room to riff and play as characters meet for the first time or see each other again. Strange and Downey Jr. Being a woman in public is bad for your health in Kabul. So is educating women. Need outweighs risk. So she adopts a pseudonym on advice from her friend, Shauzia Soma Bhatia , who is in the very same position as Parvana, and goes about the business of learning how to play-act as a dude in a world curated by dudes.

Twomey gives The Breadwinner ballast, binding it to the real-world history that serves as its basis, and elevates it to realms of imagination at the same time. Incredibles 2 Year: Director: Brad Bird Incredibles 2 starts right where the first film ended, with the costumed Family Parr reacting to the arrival of the Underminer John Ratzenberger. Their scuffle with the villain gains the attention of Winston Deavor Bob Odenkirk —or more precisely, allows Deavor and his sister, Evelyn Catherine Keener , to gain the attention of the Parrs.

To do so, they want to enlist Elastigirl Holly Hunter as the tip of the spear in their charm offensive, leaving Mr.

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Incredible Craig T. Nelson on the sidelines for now. She tends to fight crime in a manner that results in less property damage than her husband, after all. The family interactions, one strength among many with the first film, remain a delight in the sequel. Watching Elastigirl operate almost makes one feel sorry for the criminals. Delving more into the plot would do the film a disservice—suffice to say both villainous and family challenges are faced, and it takes a village, Frozone Samuel L. Jackson and Edna Mode Bird to emerge victorious. This is the fourth feature from Mungiu, who has proved to be a master of the minor.

In his breakout second feature, 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days , the arduous process to secure an abortion was enough to sustain a taut, real-time thriller. In his follow-up Beyond the Hills , the tense relationship between two childhood friends became a springboard for a drama about religious faith and devotion. Rarely has cheating on a test been fraught with such significance. Star Wars: The Last Jedi Year: Director: Rian Johnson The Last Jedi , unlike its predecessor, has the freedom to be daring, and perhaps the most thrilling thing about it—and there are many, many thrilling things—is how abundantly it takes advantage of that freedom.

If The Force Awakens was basically just Star Wars told again in a new, but familiar way, The Last Jedi challenges the audience, challenges the Star Wars mythos, even challenges the whole damned series itself. It blows the universe up to rebuild it; it is a continuation and a new beginning. And more than anything else, it goes places no Star Wars film has ever dreamed of going.

In a way, the success J. That movie reminded you how much power and primal force this series still had. This movie is an even more impressive magic trick: It uses that power and force to connect you to something larger. Not everything in The Last Jedi works perfectly, but even its few missteps are all founded in the desire for something new, to take risks, to push an American myth into uncomfortable new directions.

Chow Yun-Fat, Michelle Yeoh and Zhang Ziyi play 19th-century warriors whose loyalty and vitality are tested by a series of events that lead each to contemplate their many decisions that brought them together. Beyond the entrancing and lyrical storytelling, Crouching Tiger stands as a rare, beautiful beacon of hope: a foreign film that was actually universally embraced by Western audiences.

Instead, Saulnier simply presents us this nutty scenario without feeling the need to lard it up with anything as cumbersome as topical commentary or moral ambiguity. He proceeds to wring as much tension and suspense from its pulpy retro plot as possible, adding a few entertaining grace notes along the way, which can best be seen in its performances. Meanwhile, Saulnier supports these characters and plot turns with filmmaking that is remarkable for its economy and patience. Sean Porter gets a lot of mileage out of the cramped quarters and grimy lighting of the bar, lending its wide 2.

In those ways, the lean, mean Green Room stands as one of the best B-movie genre exercises in many years. Critical examination aside, it truly is a frightening film, from the scene where Cole is locked in a box with an abusive ghost to the little moments I always found the scene where all the kitchen cabinets and drawers open at once while off-screen to be particularly effective. For better or worse, though, this is the defining film of M. Rarely has the danger of success been so clearly illustrated for an artist—Shyamalan crafted a scary film that still holds up today, and then spent most of the next decade chasing that same accomplishment with rapidly diminishing returns that have only recently been rehabilitated with the likes of Split.

They have attention to detail, but they are not delicate in their handling. They have multiple intentions, and they bring those intentions together to jam. Okja is also not a film about veganism, but it is a film that asks how we can find integrity and, above all, how we can act humanely towards other creatures, humans included. The answers Okja reaches are simple and vital, and without really speaking them it helps you hear those answers for yourself because it has asked all the right questions, and it has asked them in a way that is intensely engaging.

Christian Slater whipping out a gun on some school bullies in the lunch room, or Veronica Winona Ryder passively lighting her cigarette with the flames licking from the explosion of her former boyfriend. Although nearly all the action sequences are wonderfully exhaustive and memorable, the final fight , as one should expect, is a breathless show-stopper. Alexander Smith. Rarely has abject terror and helplessness been so perfectly captured as it is here, Carrie desperately, pathetically clinging to her classmates in terror of her first menstruation, only to be derided and pelted with tampons as she lays in a screaming heap.

Carrie is a brisk film which thrives on those two strong, central performances, building to the gloriously cathartic orgy of revenge we all know is coming. Private Life Year: Director: Tamara Jenkins A rich film with the confidence to take its time, allowing its characters to unfurl and its themes to grow and develop, Private Life is a quietly remarkable comedy-drama about family, marriage and getting older. To accomplish all that, writer-director Tamara Jenkins uses as her entryway a familiar scenario: a something couple struggling to have a baby. Giamatti and Hahn play Richard and Rachel, who have been married for quite some time, each of them enjoying a satisfying creative life in New York City.

Private Life devotes a significant amount of its early running time to showing how couples such as Richard and Rachel undergo IVF, which has its comic moments but is largely depressingly clinical. Adding to the despair are the long lines of other expectant couples Richard and Rachel see in the waiting rooms sitting alongside them.

Did they focus on their art at the expense of parenthood? Now that the shine is off their early creative success, is their barrenness another indication of their growing irrelevance? Perhaps most pressingly, are they obsessing about having a child because, deep down, they know their marriage has troubles? That its centerpiece is a sweet romance, between a quiet young woman Zoe Kazan and a noble cowboy Bill Heck leading her wagon train along the Oregon Trail, proves that the Coens still have beautiful surprises in store more than three decades deep into their career-long odyssey of American life.

Gerard ; and ultimately, reluctantly her overbearing mother, Edna Divine. Or, in my case, of repeating full scenes to people as a clueless, obsessive nerd. Holy Grail is, indeed, the most densely packed comedy in the Python canon. Your anger. Not only can George and Martha hurt each other like no one else, but they can care for one another like no one else too.