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Salt as you go. Don't be afraid of salt!

10 Things Every Cook Should Know

Since you're cooking a fresh meal instead of eating a packaged one, you're starting out with much less sodium to begin with. But lose the salt shaker. Use a small bowl of kosher salt and add pinches as you cook and taste. It's easier to control the amount and ensures even coverage.

12 Pro Techniques Every Serious Home Cook Should Know | Bon Appétit

Tongs are an extension of your hand. Walk into any restaurant kitchen and you'll see a set of tongs in almost every cook's hand — usually gripped low down on the handle for maximum control.


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Use it to flip meat, pull a pan out of the oven, stabilize a steak while slicing, the list goes on and on. Put a wet paper towel under a cutting board. Not only are cutting boards that slide on the counter annoying, they're extremely dangerous when you're holding a knife and trying to chop something. Wet a paper towel and lay it under the board and it won't budge!

Sear chicken breast and finish in oven. Chefs sear a piece of meat, poultry, or fish in a pan and then place it in the oven.

20 Easy Cooking Tricks from Master Chefs

Not only does this free up burners, it results in a much moister result. Don't overcrowd your pan. When roasting or browning anything, the tendency is to cram as much in the pan as possible — resist! Do it in smaller batches instead. Crowding the pan leads to steaming and lowers the temperature of the pan so you won't get the caramelization you're looking for — and that's where the flavor is.

Cook with a ratio of butter and oil. Oil stops the butter from burning and the butter adds richness to the dish. Cut the ends off onions, tomatoes, cantaloupe, etc. Pretty much do this for any other food that does not stay stable on the cutting board to make a flat surface. This allows you to have complete control of the item as you chop. When baking, only mix until all ingredients are incorporated. Over-mixing causes toughness by developing gluten in the flour. For light and fluffy cupcakes, only mix until the batter's come together. Your broiler is basically an upside down grill.

11 Cooking Tips Pro Chefs Swear By (and You Should Too)

Use it for more than storage! Don't forget the power of your nose. I carry mine in my apron pocket at all times. Yet there are few places doing it with the precision of Wildair , where typical calamari and marinara are replaced with segments of squid encased in a golden chicharron-like shell, primed for dipping into aioli. Sometimes the simplest chef-y tool can revolutionize your weeknight dinner.

My Good Food

Why do you need one? What are you supposed to do with that wilted head of forgotten lettuce in your fridge? We asked Abra Berens from Stock in Chicago to teach us how to make something lovely from the frosty depths of the crisper drawer.

The Flavor Bible by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg

Where most chefs used to just reach for kosher salt, there are now many paths to savory goodness. Hawker Fare chef James Syhabout uses briny fermented agents to pack flavor and salinity in a single punch. So why would you add saltiness only to your food when you can add complexity as well? Chefs everywhere know it: Fire is where the magic happens. Turns out, the one tool you need to make a wood-fired meal yourself is right there in your living room. We extoll the virtues of medium-rare pork, raw eggs, and past-its-expiration-date dairy.