Manual Vivir a fondo. Reflexiones sobre la vida cotidiana (Spanish Edition)

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With respect to sympathetic curiosity, unbiased responsiveness, and openness of mind , we may say that the adult should be growing in childlikeness. One statement is as true as the other. A mind that is adequately sensitive to the needs and occasions of the present actuality will have the liveliest of motives for interest in the background of the present, and will never have to hunt for a way back because it will never have lost connection.

Thus we have completed the circuit and returned to the conceptions of the first portion of this book: such as the biological continuity of human impulses and instincts with natural energies; the dependence of the growth of mind upon participation in conjoint activities having a common purpose; the influence of the physical environment through the uses made of it in the social medium; the necessity of utilization of individual variations in desire and thinking for a progressively developing society; the essential unity of method and subject matter; the intrinsic continuity of ends and means; the recognition of mind as thinking which perceives and tests the meanings of behavior.

This situation makes the fact even more surprising that it is this particular Spanish version that still being published nowadays. On this occasion, Dewey refines his philosophy to make it easier for the reader to grasp the background of his pedagogic ideas. This made it possible for Luzuriaga to get the right translation this time. And yet, it is precisely as a reaction against this type of dichotomies that pragmatism was founded. Finally, to relate the subject matter of the writings and the periods in which they were published — s 5 references , 15 s 13 references , 16 s 26 references , 17 and s 25 references , 18 — there is a clear rise in interest, albeit modest in comparison to the attention Deweyan studies receive in Italy and other European countries.

The first is regarding its form and scope, whereas the second involves the content and approach of the written works in the analysis. Thus, in the first, it should be noted that the list of writings presented here must be read as provisional and under constant revision, since it would be unwise to claim that our analysis includes each and every publication without exception of the works on Dewey published in Spain since Although we can state that we have located many if not most of them, there may still be others we missed.

In any case, the nature of the analysis lends itself to periodic updating. In the second point, although the main purpose of this analysis was to quantify the rise in interest in Dewey in contemporary Spanish pedagogy, a global assessment can be made of what this production means. This is due to two main reasons. Spain is by no means immune to this problem, as can be seen in the Spanish example given above of how Dewey gets lost, this time, in translation. Nevertheless, this is consistent with what happened in the past. It is as if the reasons why Dewey was only partially known by scholars and professionals in Spanish education in the ILE circles continued on today in the theory of education in Spain, under new forms of inertia but leading to a similar result in terms of not taking Dewey seriously.

As Dewey himself said, we can understand these inertias as habits and customs of thought:. We are always possessed by habits and customs, and this fact signifies that we are always influenced by the inertia and the momentum of forces temporally outgrown but nevertheless still present with us as a part of our being. Human life gets set in patterns, institutional and moral. LW This is quite astonishing since in terms of the development of thinking about education for democracy in the 20th century, the figure of John Dewey towers above everyone else.

His is the most significant contribution to thinking about education and democracy. And a more detailed revision of how Dewey defined the field of philosophy of education in Democracy and Education would also be extremely useful in solving some of the core problems that the theory of education is facing today in Spain. Thus, while the case of the theory of education in Spain is a historical problem that needs to be analyzed historically, the motives and outcomes of this decision were and are epistemological. As such, I also think the answer comes in the shape of an epistemological proposal, conscious of its inheritance and knowledgeable of the needs and problems of today.

However, I believe the problem may be in the shape and direction of that wish by thinking that theory and practice are two substantially contrary things, different and irreconcilable. The theory of education is neither more nor better as a theory of education, it will not generate more or better growth, not in itself as a discipline, not in education as a field of interest, if it is less theory based and more practice based, or less philosophy and more science, or less speculative and more empirical.

Perhaps the problem lies in the question itself, and perhaps also in the hope of finding a disciplinary model that normatively closes how supposedly theoretical and practical discourses should be modulated. Perhaps what we need to do is simply to initiate a real conversation in the form of our own reconstruction. A more detailed revision of how Dewey defined the field of philosophy of education in Democracy and Education would also be extremely useful in solving some of the core problems that the theory of education is facing today in Spain.

The argument I am advancing here is that the pragmatism that gave Dewey such good results when exploring a philosophy of education that is deeply educational while still being philosophy may also help solve some of the problems felt in the theory of education in Spain. At the same time, this would also lead us to a more integrated reading of Dewey, rather than strictly philosophical or purely pedagogical.

Moreover, such integration is fundamental in Dewey, since philosophy to him has a transformative sense with a certain direction. Indeed, this dual transformative-orientative quality of philosophy is what makes it a deeply educational area. Therefore, rebuilding the theory of education as per Dewey would lead us to understand his activity as i an imminently empirical endeavor that ii does not propose transcending the realm of experience, and that, however, iii can be explored along many different paths, the most characteristic being the conceptual path.

It may be well worth our while to try. Angelini L. Ayala P. Barrena S. Barroso M. Bellmann J. Boydston J. Blanco G. Blanco R. Broncano A. Schriewer , eds. Cadrecha M. Campbell J. Journal of the Central-European Pragmatist Forum , 1, 2, Carbajal P. Carda R. Carreras C. Carreras i Planas C. Clavo M. Colmenar C. Colom A. Revista Interuniversitaria 16 , Cremades A. Curtis M. Currie - Knight K. De la Fuente M. Del Castillo R.

Del Pozo M. Dewey J. New Vocabulary Supplement II.

Editorial Reviews

Retrieved from [global-language. Duran J. Evans K. Fairfield P. Feinberg W. Fermoso P. Revista Interuniversitaria 3 , Garrison J. Good J. Guichot V. Hickman L. Spadafora , eds. Jackson P. Johnston J. Jorge M. Stanley Hall, E. Jover G. Larrauri M. Margolis J. Mendes L. Miranda M. Mirard W.

Miras N. Molero A. Del Pozo , eds. Molinos M. Nubiola J. Oelkers J. Oliverio S. Pappas G.

Vivir a fondo : reflexiones sobre la vida cotidiana

Popkewitz T. Rabazas T. Romo A. Ruiz G. Santos M. Sarramona J. Seoane J. Serrano J. Schriewer , J. Stromnes A. Thoilliez B. Oelkers , eds. Trachtenberg T.

Von Feilizen C. Westbrook R. Spain was one of the places where his works gained attention first and foremost in the field of education and were therefore translated. In it he called for an archconservative conception of education and a limit to academic freedom.

A group of important university professors responded by resigning their professorships and starting up a self-financed alternative university independent from the state government in August the ILE. Its aim was clear: to develop and modernize science and to foment a physical, moral, and cultural regeneration of the nation. The ILE was the undeniable protagonist in innovating science and education in Spain in the early s. In fact,. These, however, were cut short during the Spanish Civil War and later silenced and forgotten during the long years of the Franco dictatorship Especially noteworthy in their academic careers was their work as translators, as a means to disseminate the new pedagogical ideas that were emerging and circulating in the late 19th and early 20th centuries all over the West.

We will do so by focusing on how some key concepts to Deweyan thought were reflected in the Spanish versions of these two books. Table 1. Only by being true to the full growth of all the individuals who make it up, can society by any chance be true to itself. The child must be brought into contact with more grown people and with more children in order that there may be the freest and richest social life.

Moreover, the occupations and relationships of the home environment are not specially selected for the growth of the child; the main object is something else, and what the child can get out of them is incidental. Hence the need of a school. In this school the life of the child becomes the all controlling aim. All the media necessary to further the growth of the child center there. Another instinct of the child is the use of pencil and paper. All children like to express themselves through the medium of form and color. If you simply indulge this interest by letting the child go on indefinitely, there is no growth that is more than accidental.

Now, keeping in mind these fourfold interests —the interest in conversation or communication; in inquiry or finding out things; in making things, or construction; and in artistic expression we may say they are the natural resources, the uninvested capital, upon the exercise of which depends the active growth of the child. Unless culture be a superficial polish, a veneering of mahogany over common wood, it surely is this —the growth of the imagination in flexibility, in scope, and in sympathy, till the life which the individual lives is informed with the life of nature and of society.

When nature and society can live in the schoolroom, when the forms and tools of learning are subordinated to the substance of experience, then shall there be an opportunity for this identification, and culture shall be the democratic password. Moreover, if the school is related as a whole to life as a whole, its various aims and ideals culture, discipline, information, utility cease to be variants, for one of which we must select one study and for another.

The growth of the child in the direction of social capacity and service, his larger and more vital union with life, becomes the unifying aim; and discipline, culture and information fall into place as phases of this growth. One thing, then, we wanted to find out is how much can be given a child that is really worth his while to get, in knowledge of the world about him, of the forces in the world, of historical and social growth , and in capacity to express himself in a variety of artistic forms. From the strictly educational side this has been the chief problem of the school.

Este ha sido el mayor problema de la escuela, desde el punto de vista estrictamente educativo. At the end of three years, then, we are not afraid to say that some of our original questions have secured affirmative answers. The increase of our children from fifteen to almost one hundred, along with a practical doubling of fees, has shown that parents are ready for a form of education that makes individual growth its sole controlling aim.


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The everyday work of the school shows that children can live in school as out of it, and yet grow daily in wisdom, kindness, and the spirit of obedience that learning may, even with little children, lay hold upon the substance of truth that nourishes the spirit, and yet the forms of knowledge be observed and cultivated; and that growth may be genuine and thorough, and yet a delight. MW 1: The more natural and straightforward these are [ the cluster of suggestions, reminiscences, and anticipations that gather about things the child uses ], the more definite basis there is for calling up and holding together all the allied suggestions which make his imaginative play really representative.

This continuity is often interfered with by the very methods that aim at securing it. The methodology to use in planning early childhood education:. Nothing is more absurd than to suppose that there is no middle term between leaving a child to his own unguided fancies and likes or controlling his activities by a formal succession of dictated directions MW 1: The study of this translation focuses on how two key concepts to Deweyan thought are reflected in the Spanish version.

Three main interpretative remarks will follow. Table 2. We have explicitly added, however, the recognition of the part played in the joint activity by the use of things. The philosophy of learning has been unduly dominated by a false psychology. It is frequently stated that a person learns by merely having the qualities of things impressed upon his mind through the gateway of the senses. The difference between an adjustment to a physical stimulus and a mental act is that the latter involves response to a thing in its meaning; the former does not. A noise may make me jump without my mind being implicated.

The conception that growth and progress are just approximations to a final unchanging goal is the last infirmity of the mind in its transition from a static to a dynamic understanding of life. It simulates the style of the latter. It pays the tribute of speaking much of development, process, progress. But all of these operations are conceived to be merely transitional; they lack meaning on their own account.

They possess significance only as movements toward something away from what is now going on. Since growth is just a movement toward a completed being, the final ideal is immobile. An abstract and indefinite future is in control with all which that connotes in depreciation of present power and opportunity. Paga el tributo de hablar mucho de desarrollo, proceso, progreso. The adult uses his powers to transform his environment, thereby occasioning new stimuli which redirect his powers and keep them developing.

Ignoring this fact means arrested development, a passive accommodation. Normal child and normal adult alike, in other words, are engaged in growing. The difference between them is not the difference between growth and no growth , but between the modes of growth appropriate to different conditions.

With respect to the development of powers devoted to coping with specific scientific and economic problems we may say the child should be growing in manhood. With respect to sympathetic curiosity, unbiased responsiveness, and openness of mind , we may say that the adult should be growing in childlikeness. One statement is as true as the other.

A mind that is adequately sensitive to the needs and occasions of the present actuality will have the liveliest of motives for interest in the background of the present, and will never have to hunt for a way back because it will never have lost connection.


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Thus we have completed the circuit and returned to the conceptions of the first portion of this book: such as the biological continuity of human impulses and instincts with natural energies; the dependence of the growth of mind upon participation in conjoint activities having a common purpose; the influence of the physical environment through the uses made of it in the social medium; the necessity of utilization of individual variations in desire and thinking for a progressively developing society; the essential unity of method and subject matter; the intrinsic continuity of ends and means; the recognition of mind as thinking which perceives and tests the meanings of behavior.

This situation makes the fact even more surprising that it is this particular Spanish version that still being published nowadays. On this occasion, Dewey refines his philosophy to make it easier for the reader to grasp the background of his pedagogic ideas. This made it possible for Luzuriaga to get the right translation this time. And yet, it is precisely as a reaction against this type of dichotomies that pragmatism was founded. Finally, to relate the subject matter of the writings and the periods in which they were published — s 5 references , 15 s 13 references , 16 s 26 references , 17 and s 25 references , 18 — there is a clear rise in interest, albeit modest in comparison to the attention Deweyan studies receive in Italy and other European countries.

The first is regarding its form and scope, whereas the second involves the content and approach of the written works in the analysis. Thus, in the first, it should be noted that the list of writings presented here must be read as provisional and under constant revision, since it would be unwise to claim that our analysis includes each and every publication without exception of the works on Dewey published in Spain since Although we can state that we have located many if not most of them, there may still be others we missed.

In any case, the nature of the analysis lends itself to periodic updating. In the second point, although the main purpose of this analysis was to quantify the rise in interest in Dewey in contemporary Spanish pedagogy, a global assessment can be made of what this production means. This is due to two main reasons. Spain is by no means immune to this problem, as can be seen in the Spanish example given above of how Dewey gets lost, this time, in translation. Nevertheless, this is consistent with what happened in the past. It is as if the reasons why Dewey was only partially known by scholars and professionals in Spanish education in the ILE circles continued on today in the theory of education in Spain, under new forms of inertia but leading to a similar result in terms of not taking Dewey seriously.

As Dewey himself said, we can understand these inertias as habits and customs of thought:. We are always possessed by habits and customs, and this fact signifies that we are always influenced by the inertia and the momentum of forces temporally outgrown but nevertheless still present with us as a part of our being. Human life gets set in patterns, institutional and moral. LW This is quite astonishing since in terms of the development of thinking about education for democracy in the 20th century, the figure of John Dewey towers above everyone else. His is the most significant contribution to thinking about education and democracy.

And a more detailed revision of how Dewey defined the field of philosophy of education in Democracy and Education would also be extremely useful in solving some of the core problems that the theory of education is facing today in Spain. Thus, while the case of the theory of education in Spain is a historical problem that needs to be analyzed historically, the motives and outcomes of this decision were and are epistemological. As such, I also think the answer comes in the shape of an epistemological proposal, conscious of its inheritance and knowledgeable of the needs and problems of today.

However, I believe the problem may be in the shape and direction of that wish by thinking that theory and practice are two substantially contrary things, different and irreconcilable. The theory of education is neither more nor better as a theory of education, it will not generate more or better growth, not in itself as a discipline, not in education as a field of interest, if it is less theory based and more practice based, or less philosophy and more science, or less speculative and more empirical.

Perhaps the problem lies in the question itself, and perhaps also in the hope of finding a disciplinary model that normatively closes how supposedly theoretical and practical discourses should be modulated. Perhaps what we need to do is simply to initiate a real conversation in the form of our own reconstruction.

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A more detailed revision of how Dewey defined the field of philosophy of education in Democracy and Education would also be extremely useful in solving some of the core problems that the theory of education is facing today in Spain. The argument I am advancing here is that the pragmatism that gave Dewey such good results when exploring a philosophy of education that is deeply educational while still being philosophy may also help solve some of the problems felt in the theory of education in Spain.

At the same time, this would also lead us to a more integrated reading of Dewey, rather than strictly philosophical or purely pedagogical. Moreover, such integration is fundamental in Dewey, since philosophy to him has a transformative sense with a certain direction. Indeed, this dual transformative-orientative quality of philosophy is what makes it a deeply educational area.

Therefore, rebuilding the theory of education as per Dewey would lead us to understand his activity as i an imminently empirical endeavor that ii does not propose transcending the realm of experience, and that, however, iii can be explored along many different paths, the most characteristic being the conceptual path.

It may be well worth our while to try. Angelini L. Ayala P. Barrena S. Barroso M. Bellmann J. Boydston J. Blanco G. Blanco R. Broncano A. Schriewer , eds. Cadrecha M. Campbell J. Journal of the Central-European Pragmatist Forum , 1, 2, Carbajal P. Carda R. Carreras C. Carreras i Planas C. Clavo M.